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Oct 24, 2013

"Patternmaking For Menswear" by Gareth Kershaw -- My Dream Book!



Readers, after publishing the sumptuous, "Draping: The Complete Course" by Karolyn Kiisel last month, what could Laurence King Publishing possibly do for an encore?

I now know the answer!  It is the equally superb "Patternmaking for Menswear" by Gareth Kershew, which has just been released and a complimentary copy of which I was fortunate to receive from Laurence King last week.





As most of you know, menswear is generally created from flat patterns, or slopers, based on specific body measurements.  "Patternmaking For Menswear" expertly guides the reader through all the specifics of this process in clear detail.

It's all here: how to take men's measurements, creating basic slopers, supplies needed, grading, and so much more.  NOTE: The focus here is patternmaking, not sewing or specific tailoring techniques.











The book includes instructions on how to create twenty different projects -- shirts, pants, and outwear.  These designs are contemporary, even hip.  If brand names like Woolrich Woolen Mills, C.P. Company and Engineered Garments mean anything to you, you'll find many of the designs in this book drawn from their inspired updating of classic American workwear and outdoor gear.





















"Patternmaking for Menswear" is beautifully designed, generously illustrated and extremely well-written.

If you are interested in designing menswear, or already create menswear for yourself or for others, I think you will find this book a must-have.  (It is available for sale on Amazon -- approximately $38 as of today)

I can't wait to put it to use.

You can see many more photos from "Patternmaking for Menswear" here.  I think you'll be impressed.

Enjoy!

37 comments:

  1. I'm not really anonymous, but I happen to be working in NYC this week and google won't let me sign in without giving a phone number . . . well, I didn't bring a phone - I know, Neanderthal. But if you could see what they charge in France for a phone that works when you are (back) in the US. . . oy ANYWAY, I hope I can find the book before I leave to go back.

    Nice score, Peter, and all you had to do was write hundreds of blog posts and subject yourself total public scrutiny to get it.

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    1. You might try Around the World books in the Garment District.

      http://www.aroundtheworldnyc.com/

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    2. Got mine from Amazon yesterday!!!

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    3. I always show up as Anonymous, even if I DO sign in LOL anyway, I have the software Garment Designer from cochenile, wonder if this book would mean I could transfer the design to the software, for even easier resizing!!

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    4. hummm... now I'm unknown, yet I sign in with google - what is the point ROFLMAO

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  2. PS: I sure hope there are more nekked pics in the book like the one showing you how to measure. Sewing books need to take some hints from Abercrombie. :))

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  3. Even though books like his tend to take some of the mystery out of menswear drafting, I'm a bit sceptical at the same time. Specific cutting and drafting books deal very much with proper fitting (which as you know is an art in itself).
    I've often found that books like the Kershaw one don't cover this important aspect in enough depth. Maybe I'm wrong about this book though because I haven't read it. You never see or hear the word "sloper" in a cutter's drafting book and when I do, its commonly because it is women's drafting, or couture style design adapted for menswear. This may be less of problem for a lot of people though. I realise not everyone is looking to follow traditional tailoring.

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    1. I agree, Roger. Although.....while using words like "sloper" when referring to any menswear draft makes *me* cringe...perhaps that kind of terminology might make drafting menswear less "frightening" to those non-professionals who are talented sewing enthusiasts eager to learn more....and to me that's always a good thing. :) ..and now, it's time for me to draft a new shirt for one of my clients!

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    2. In the FIT Menswear program pattern making classes the students draft a sloper and develop designs from that. In one class there is a project in which the students draft a pair of trousers for themselves and go through a few fittings to have an understanding of the challenges of fitting for someone who's not a model. But I think that most of the exercises are for a Size 40 dress form.

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    3. Its really nice to read so many opinions about my book. If I can get people to be vocal about a subject that deserves more recognition in the industry and can inspire students to investigate menswear that's a good thing! I have to agree with Roger's comments above that fitting is a specialty mainly learnt on the job, and with a limited page count it can be hard to cover everything in great detail. Not wanting to detract or suggest that pattern making should be only learnt from book's. In an market place were educational trends veer towards decreasing studio hours and more reliance on online material through self directed learning. The focus of this project was encourage students to be creative and develop a studio practice through the medium of Menswear.
      Thank you Peter Lappin for your kind words and featuring my book.

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    4. Hi would this book be for someone such as myself who is a complete newbie to drafting my own patterns? Also would it work for someone my size? I'm a big guy and I wear a 19 1/2, 35/36 shirt and a 53 waist and a 30 inch inseam. Thank you.

      Mark

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    5. Hello Gareth, I noticed on Amazon, that lists two books, one that has pattern making and the other pattern cutting, but books appear identical. What are the differences in these two books? Thank you.

      Jeffrey

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  4. That book looks amazing! What a great resource for you!

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  5. Why do you suppose they want male models to have that ...I dunno...pissed off....look?

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  6. Looks like something you'll have a lot of fun with.

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  7. Making your own patterns is just the perfect next step for you! You sew beautifully, you already adapt and re-style the commercial patterns you use: time to start your own label! Thinking of a name will be most entertaining.

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  8. Funnily when I was searching on Amazon, there is another men's patternmaking book called "Patternmaking for menswear: classic to contemporary" which will be released next year. I have attached the link below. Decisions, decisions...it seems we've been waiting ages for a comprehensive book in that field and then 2 come along!
    http://www.amazon.com/Patternmaking-Menswear-Contemporary-Injoo-Kim/dp/160901944X

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    1. I noticed that too. Maybe it's like the dueling Jean Harlow bio-pics that both came out in 1965! ;0

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  9. Interesting...although drafting menswear (especially shirts) is not that hard...I hand-draft menswear patterns every week and now even have a contract with a major pattern company. This new book looks interesting...how does it compare to the" The Practical Guide to Patternmaking for Fashion Designers-Menswear" by Knowles ? Not that there is a contest, lol, but the Knowles book, in my professional opinion, would be pretty hard to top.

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  10. Thanks for the heads up. I looked for it on Amazon UK and it looks like the UK edition is called Pattern Cutting for Menswear.

    Added to the top of the wishlist. I foolishly promised someone some shirts and a coat.



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  11. Oooh, I am so excited for this book! I've been wanting to dive more into sewing for my dude, but he's hated every pattern I've found for him.

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  12. I'm a complete newbie and am just about finished with my first pair of KS3504 pants. Your sew-along has helped tons with that! Not sure I am ready for pattern drafting but, I am sure I will at least find some clarity within the pages. I should have my copy from Amazon by Monday.
    Thanks for sharing,
    James

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  13. oohhh! I will definitely have to check this out! thanks for the great review!

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  14. Very cool! I want this. I make clothes for my husband and stepson and my fashion design book joy had basic patternmaking for men's clothes. Oh, and I love those sweatpants, I want to make some for myself!

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  15. Thanks for the tip about this book.
    I ordered it too, through your amazon link. But it will take some time to fly over the ocean to reach Israel :)
    Mabye I'll make a KS3504 in the meanwhile...

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  16. I can't wait to get my book. I just ordered one. I am excited about making some clothes for my very tall thin son.

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  17. The book looks good. An FIT Menswear student who had a professional pattern making background recommended this book, by Roberts and Onishenko:

    http://www.amazon.com/Fundamentals-Mens-Fashion-Design-Clothes/dp/0870055143

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  18. Yes, that book looks very good! I wasn't going to order anymore pattern books, but...

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  19. Is anyone else a little confused by the raglan sleeve on page 97. I can't seem to wrap my head around it.

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  20. Thanks, i just may have to get this. And thanks to you (and Amazon as well) for the pics, the book looks very informative.

    One thing i noticed though that in one of the pics that shows the front and back shirt block, it looks like the shoulders are even height, front to back, like a t-shirt. The shoulder seam on this kind of pattern set up will be continually pulling towards the back (the back neck also looked a little shallow).

    After drafting this out, i would trim 1/2" from the Front shoulder seam and add it back to the Back shoulder seam and blend in your neck and armhole curves accordingly. Moving the shoulder forward just looks a little neater and nicer to me but all my store bought shirts and polos have "t-shirt" shoulders that pull backward so i guess it's not a critical and noticable aspect anymore.

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  21. Hi Peter would this book be for someone such as myself who is a complete newbie to drafting my own patterns? Also would it work for someone my size? I'm a big guy and I wear a 19 1/2, 35/36 shirt and a 53 waist and a 30 inch inseam. Thank you.

    Mark

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  22. How do you feel it compares with Winifred Aldrich books?

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  23. This book looks good but had serious flaws, block front and back have exactly the same shoulder angle,this may work for casual wear but not for tailored jackets,also the cross front and back measure exactly the same, the trouser rise is way too long.l was really looking forward to this book but very disappointing.

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  24. I'm considering buying either this book or the Lori Knowles "Practical Guide to Patternmaking for Fashion Designers: Menswear" book, both are in the range of 40-50 dollars shipped. I know this is an old post, but does Peter or anyone else have a recommendation of one over the other? I want to draft a jeans pattern as I'm throughly frustrated with the patterns I've found so far... and then move on to shirts (sweatshirts actually).

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